Recent Updates

Modified on: 
Nov 14, 2019
Authors: Gwen Clarke, MD, FRCPC; Jacqueline Côté, MLT; and Debra Lane, MD, FRCPC
Publication date: October 2019
Primary target audiences: Medical laboratory technologists (MLTs) in a hospital laboratory, transfusion medicine physicians

Key points

  • Anti-M is rarely clinically significant.
  • Patients with anti-M should receive red blood cell units crossmatch compatible by IAT or equivalent using IgG antihuman globulin for transfusion.
Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 13, 2019

Anti-Le, commonly anti-Lea, Leb, or Leab, are antibodies directed to antigens of the Lewis blood group system. The Lewis antigens are glycoproteins that are found on the surface of many cells and secreted in various body fluids. As such, Lewis, along with ABO and H are sometimes referred to as “histo-blood groups,” given the fact they are present on many different tissue types.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 13, 2019

Anti-Kpa is an antibody directed to an antigen of the Kell blood group system. The Kell antigens are located on the red blood cell transmembrane glycoprotein known as CD238, and consist of a large group of 35 antigens. Some of these antigens are highly immunogenic, and after the ABO and Rh blood group systems, they are the most common immunogenic group for red blood cells. However, Anti-Kpa itself is extremely rare.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 7, 2019

All blood transfused in Canada is collected from volunteer donors. To ensure the safety of the blood products, donors are carefully screened against an extended list of eligibility criteria. In addition, the donated blood is tested to identify the donor’s blood group and to detect blood group antibodies and transfusion-transmissible pathogens. Donor eligibility criteria and testing also benefit the donors by, for example, reducing potential blood donation-related health risks.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Oct 28, 2019

Background

Originally all plasma fractionation products were derived from pooled human plasma. Increasingly, many plasma proteins are manufactured by biotechnology as recombinant proteins, without need for donated plasma; depending on the plasma protein product, either a recombinant or fractionated product, or both are available in Canada.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Oct 17, 2019

We are pleased to present the seventh annual report describing transmissible blood-borne infection surveillance. High quality and timely surveillance is central to the safety of the blood supply. This includes monitoring of transmissible disease markers that the blood is tested for (including bacteria) and investigation of any reports of possible transfusion transmission, as well as a horizon scan for any new pathogens that may pose a risk.

PDF versions of current and past Surveillance Reports:

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Sep 6, 2019

Author: Rob Romans, ART, BSc
Online publication date: August 2019

Background

In August 2018, the National Advisory Committee on Blood and Blood Products (NAC) endorsed the document “Guidance on Platelet Transfusion for Patients With Hypoproliferative Thrombocytopenia” published by the International Collaboration for Transfusion Medicine Guidelines (ICTMG).1, 2, 3

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Sep 4, 2019

Author: Rachel Ward, JD, BCom
Online publication date: August 2019
Target audience: health-care professionals and academics conducting research projects involving human participants.

This article provides health-care professionals and researchers with an overview of the frameworks that help protect individuals’ privacy in the context of research, a topic that is particularly relevant in a time of big data, artificial intelligence and significant advances in technologies that are reliant on data inputs.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Aug 26, 2019

A. Reporting

Attention: All transfusion reactions (mild to life-threatening) and transfusion-related errors must be reported to the hospital’s transfusion service (blood bank).

What:

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Aug 26, 2019
Transfusion

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