Recent Updates

Modified on: 
Apr 15, 2019

/sites/msi/files/10880-eng-kpd_brochure.pdfTwo new patient and public education and awareness brochures are now available! View or download What is Living Kidney Paired Donation and Kidney Paired Donation (KPD) Program

Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
Apr 12, 2019

A. Reporting

Attention: All transfusion reactions (mild to life-threatening) and transfusion-related errors must be reported to the hospital’s transfusion service (blood bank).

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Apr 3, 2019

The following is a guide for reporting adverse transfusion reactions. It includes links where reporting forms may be found. This guide applies to hospitals in Canada, excluding Quebec.

Why report adverse transfusion events?

It is important that transfusion services report adverse transfusion events because:

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Apr 2, 2019

Modified or specialty blood components may be useful in specific clinical settings to reduce the risk of transfusion-related harm. Specialty blood products available to physicians include CMV-seronegative, irradiated, and washed red blood cells or platelets. This chapter describes the preparation of these blood components and the clinical setting in which they are of greatest benefit.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Mar 29, 2019

Authors: Gwen Clarke, MD, FRCPC; Jacqueline Côté, MLT; and Debra Lane, MD, FRCPC
Publication date: August 2017, updated September 2018

Background

Anti-M is an antibody directed to an antigen of the MNS blood group system. The M antigen is located on the red blood cell surface glycoprotein known as glycophorin A.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Mar 14, 2019

KTAC provides expert guidance to the development, operation and evolution of the national Kidney Paired Donation program (KPD) and Highly Sensitized Patient program (HSP) with the goal of increasing kidney transplantation in Canada. The KTAC also reviews proposed matches from each KPD match run.

Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
Feb 26, 2019

Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a rare but serious syndrome characterized by sudden acute respiratory distress following transfusion. It is defined as new, acute lung injury (ALI) during or within six hours after blood product administration in the absence of temporally-associated risk factors for ALI. All plasma-containing blood products have been implicated in TRALI, including rare reports with IVIg and cryoprecipitate.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 26, 2019

Blog Landing Page

Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
Feb 21, 2019

Read more posts from the Research, Education and Discovery blog at blood.ca/RED

Transfusion
Organs and Tissues
Stem Cells
Modified on: 
Feb 21, 2019

Read more posts from the Research, Education and Discovery blog at blood.ca/RED

Transfusion
Organs and Tissues
Stem Cells

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