Recent Updates

Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

Platelets are the smallest of the blood cells, with a diameter of two to three microns and no nucleus. Their main function is to mediate primary hemostasis, though they are involved in a number of other processes including primary immunity, tumour progression and inflammation. 

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

The approach to transfusion in emergent situations varies dramatically depending on the clinical scenario. The primary guiding determinant is the clinician’s assessment of the rapidity of bleeding, the severity of hemorrhage or amount of blood lost, and the clinical stability of the patient. Using the severely injured trauma patient as a case study, this chapter will discuss the principles of massive hemorrhage and resuscitation, with the inclusion of special situations such as obstetrical hemorrhage, where data are available.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

A. Reporting

Attention: All transfusion reactions (mild to life-threatening) and transfusion-related errors must be reported to the hospital’s transfusion service (blood bank).

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

This chapter focuses on the principles of safe blood transfusion practices. The aim of this chapter is to develop and support the knowledge of health-care professionals involved in prescribing and administering blood components and products.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

Pre-transfusion testing refers to the laboratory testing required to ensure compatibility between the blood of the transfusion recipient and the blood product intended for transfusion. This process includes proper completion of the requisition, proper patient identification, collection and labelling of the blood sample from the patient, laboratory testing to determine the patient’s blood group and to identify the presence of red blood cell alloantibodies, and compatibility testing. Pre-transfusion testing is completed when a compatible blood product is identified for transfusion to the intended recipient. This chapter provides an overview of the pre-transfusion tests that are routinely performed.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

Background

Originally all plasma fractionation products were derived from pooled human plasma. Increasingly, many plasma proteins are manufactured by biotechnology as recombinant proteins, without need of donated plasma; depending on the particular plasma protein product, a recombinant or a fractionated product or both are available in Canada.

This Chapter presents in general terms the various methods and principles by which plasma protein products are manufactured for use in patients. It is complemented by Chapter 3, 4, 5 and 6 of this Guide.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

All blood transfused in Canada is collected from volunteer donors. To ensure the safety of the blood products, donors are carefully screened against an extended list of eligibility criteria and their donated blood products are tested for transfusion-transmissible diseases. Donor eligibility criteria also reduce potential health risks for the donor. This chapter describes the donor selection process, the pathogen testing done on blood products, and the pathogen inactivation processes that can further reduce the potential risk of transfusion-transmitted diseases.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

Coagulation factor concentrates are highly effective treatments for patients with hemostatic disorders caused by missing or defective clotting factors. Coagulation factor concentrates may be extracted from pooled donated plasma (plasma-derived) or manufactured using biotechnology (recombinant). In addition, several plasma-derived protein concentrates are available for the treatment of thrombotic disorders and hereditary angioedema.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

This chapter describes when and how to use the plasma protein product albumin and introduces therapeutic alternatives to albumin.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

This chapter describes the manufacturing process for the most commonly prepared blood products: Red Blood Cells, Pooled Platelets, Frozen Plasma (FP), Apheresis Fresh Frozen Plasma (AFFP), Cryosupernatant Plasma (CSP) and Cryoprecipitate. A brief description of the indications, contraindications, storage and transportation requirements, dose, administration and available alternatives is included in the sections below. Further information may be found in other chapters of this Guide as indicated within the different sections.

Transfusion

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