Recent Updates

Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

Apheresis involves the removal of whole blood from an individual and its separation into components. A specified component is retained and the remainder is returned to the individual. Therapeutic apheresis is used to treat patients with a variety of disorders and has become a relatively common treatment modality. The rationale and techniques for therapeutic apheresis, as well as the care of the apheresis patient, will be discussed in this chapter.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

This chapter focuses on preoperative autologous donation (PAD). There are other types of autologous blood use (e.g. acute normovolemic hemodilution and intraoperative and postoperative blood salvage) which are not discussed in this chapter.

PAD refers to the donation of blood by a patient for his/her own future use; generally this is for a scheduled elective surgery. The top three procedures associated with a request for a PAD are total hip replacement, total knee replacement and hysterectomy.

In most cases, allogeneic blood transfusions are a safe and available option. Autologous and directed donations should be confined to circumstances of rare blood types or plasma protein deficiencies in which  allogeneic units may not meet patient needs. Rare blood types represent only a small number of autologous units collected each year. See Chapter 13 of this Guide for more information on directed donations.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

While the practice of transfusion of blood products to neonatal and pediatric recipients has much in common with the transfusion of blood products to adults, there are several important differences and special circumstances. This chapter highlights the most common considerations that are unique to this group of patients.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

Platelets are the smallest of the blood cells, with a diameter of two to three microns and no nucleus. Their main function is to mediate primary hemostasis, though they are involved in a number of other processes including primary immunity, tumour progression and inflammation. 

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

The approach to transfusion in emergent situations varies dramatically depending on the clinical scenario. The primary guiding determinant is the clinician’s assessment of the rapidity of bleeding, the severity of hemorrhage or amount of blood lost, and the clinical stability of the patient. Using the severely injured trauma patient as a case study, this chapter will discuss the principles of massive hemorrhage and resuscitation, with the inclusion of special situations such as obstetrical hemorrhage, where data are available.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

This chapter focuses on the principles of safe blood transfusion practices. The aim of this chapter is to develop and support the knowledge of health-care professionals involved in prescribing and administering blood components and products.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

Coagulation factor concentrates are highly effective treatments for patients with hemostatic disorders caused by missing or defective clotting factors. Coagulation factor concentrates may be extracted from pooled donated plasma (plasma-derived) or manufactured using biotechnology (recombinant). In addition, several plasma-derived protein concentrates are available for the treatment of thrombotic disorders and hereditary angioedema.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

This chapter describes when and how to use the plasma protein product albumin and introduces therapeutic alternatives to albumin.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 7, 2019

This chapter describes the manufacturing process for the most commonly prepared blood products: Red Blood Cells, Pooled Platelets, Frozen Plasma (FP), Apheresis Fresh Frozen Plasma (AFFP), Cryosupernatant Plasma (CSP) and Cryoprecipitate. A brief description of the indications, contraindications, storage and transportation requirements, dose, administration and available alternatives is included in the sections below. Further information may be found in other chapters of this Guide as indicated within the different sections.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Feb 6, 2019

This chapter reviews the testing and treatments that are relevant for mothers and their fetuses/infants during pregnancy and postnatally to reduce the risks of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) and of immune thrombocytopenias.

Transfusion

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