Recent Updates

Modified on: 
Nov 14, 2019
Authors: Gwen Clarke, MD, FRCPC; Jacqueline Côté, MLT; and Debra Lane, MD, FRCPC
Publication date: October 2019
Primary target audiences: Medical laboratory technologists (MLTs) in a hospital laboratory, transfusion medicine physicians

Key points

  • Anti-M is rarely clinically significant.
  • Patients with anti-M should receive red blood cell units crossmatch compatible by IAT or equivalent using IgG antihuman globulin for transfusion.
Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 13, 2019

Anti-Le, commonly anti-Lea, Leb, or Leab, are antibodies directed to antigens of the Lewis blood group system. The Lewis antigens are glycoproteins that are found on the surface of many cells and secreted in various body fluids. As such, Lewis, along with ABO and H are sometimes referred to as “histo-blood groups,” given the fact they are present on many different tissue types.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 13, 2019

Anti-Kpa is an antibody directed to an antigen of the Kell blood group system. The Kell antigens are located on the red blood cell transmembrane glycoprotein known as CD238, and consist of a large group of 35 antigens. Some of these antigens are highly immunogenic, and after the ABO and Rh blood group systems, they are the most common immunogenic group for red blood cells. However, Anti-Kpa itself is extremely rare.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 7, 2019

All blood transfused in Canada is collected from volunteer donors. To ensure the safety of the blood products, donors are carefully screened against an extended list of eligibility criteria. In addition, the donated blood is tested to identify the donor’s blood group and to detect blood group antibodies and transfusion-transmissible pathogens. Donor eligibility criteria and testing also benefit the donors by, for example, reducing potential blood donation-related health risks.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Nov 4, 2019

Living Kidney Campaign Resources This Fall, we’re working to raise national awa

Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
Oct 31, 2019
Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
Oct 30, 2019

Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation (OTDT) Advisory Committees

A number of advisory committees and working groups work with Canadian Blood Services on issues and initiatives related to organ donation and transplantation activities. Their work includes providing expert advise and direction on national clinical policy and practice, operational requirements, standardization of procedures, and development of the Canadian Transplant Registry services. These groups also provide input to strategic direction and initiative development and prioritization.

Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
Oct 29, 2019

Canadian Blood Services works with the Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation (OTDT) community to improve national system performance. We do this through the development of leading practices, professional education, public awareness and data analysis and reporting. We also manage clinical programs that support interprovincial sharing of organs.

Organs and Tissues
Modified on: 
Oct 28, 2019

Background

Originally all plasma fractionation products were derived from pooled human plasma. Increasingly, many plasma proteins are manufactured by biotechnology as recombinant proteins, without need for donated plasma; depending on the plasma protein product, either a recombinant or fractionated product, or both are available in Canada.

Transfusion
Modified on: 
Oct 24, 2019

The Eye and Tissue Data Committee (ETDC) supports the collection, reporting and sharing of data by the Canadian eye and tissue banking community and provides insight into the supply of and the demand for allografts in Canada. 

Members Organization
Ms. Cynthia Johnston (Chair)

Regional Tissue Bank

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Organs and Tissues

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